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Poll: Pectus Excavatum + Asthma?
I have Pectus Excavatum and have, or currently suffer from Asthma
--- 11 (57.89%)

--- 1 (5.26%)
I have Pectus Excavatum and have never been diagnosed with Asthma. --- 7 (36.84%)

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Author: Subject: Pectus Excavatum + Asthma?
Billbo
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[*] posted on 1-2-2008 at 04:04 AM
Pectus Excavatum + Asthma?


Hi all,

Just wanted to do a quick correlation between people with PE and Asthma.

I heard a theory that in early development the diaphram may be over developed and push the bottom of the rib cage outward, in turn pulling the sternum inward to compensate for this.

Cheers.
momof4boys
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[*] posted on 1-4-2008 at 09:35 AM


Hi Bill
Yes my 4 year old was just diagnosed a year ago with the pectus, I have noticed an indent on his chest for a long time, and thought it was from his heart surgery when he was 3 1/2 months old (they are not really sure what caused the pectus either) and it seems to have gotten worse. he also has asthma and they are saying that is what is causing his breathing issues, however they are realizing it might not be his asthma doing it due to the fact that he is not wheezing and his lungs are perfectly clear when he has this. so they are questioning some things and can't do much until he is 5.
I would love to post a picture of his PE but don't know how
good luck with your poll

Michelle
eric20x
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[*] posted on 1-4-2008 at 03:45 PM


i have asthma also but my son does too and he does not have pe
Northern_grl
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[*] posted on 1-8-2008 at 02:14 PM


You might be interested in this from Dr. Nuss's "history" page on the CHKD website. He says that even small obstructions to breathing can cause sternal retraction in children.

"The rationale for the technique was based on the three factors:

1. Children have soft and malleable chests. In young children, the chest is so soft that even minor respiratory obstruction can cause severe sternal retraction. Trauma rarely causes rib fractures; flail chest, etc., because “the chest is so soft and malleable.”21-23 The American Heart Association recommends “using only two fingers” when performing cardiac resuscitation in young children and “only one hand in older children” for fear of crushing the heart.

2. Even middle-aged and older adults develop a barrel-shaped chest configuration in response to chronic obstructive respiratory diseases such as emphysema. If older adults are able to reconfigure the chest wall, children and teenagers should be able to do the same, given the increased malleability of their anterior chest wall.

3. The role of braces and serial casting in successfully correcting skeletal anomalies such as scoliosis, clubfoot, and maxillomandibular malocclusion by orthopedic and orthodontic surgeons is well established. The anterior chest wall, being even more malleable than the previously mentioned skeletal structures, is therefore ideal for this type of correction."
boostd2
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[*] posted on 1-8-2008 at 09:58 PM


ive had serious asthma since i was born. im 24 years old now. i had the nuss procedure in may 2007. Prior to surgery i would require my inhaler on a average of 4-5 times a week.
But since surgery i havent had 1 asthma attack or used my inhaler.

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