Pectus Message Boards
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: Can severe Pectus Excavatum Cause Collapsed Lung?
sweetluvgurl
Contributing Member
***




Posts: 44
Registered: 3-23-2010
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 4-27-2011 at 07:18 PM
Can severe Pectus Excavatum Cause Collapsed Lung?


I went to the doctor today. Apparently, my blood pressure is low. It has always been on the low side. Could that be from the compression of my heart? I think it's why I get to feeling faint. Also, I did an x-ray just to make sure I don't have walking pneumonia... But the people in the lab wrote down nothing has changed, but they also wrote I have a collapsed left lung at the bottom part of it. Could the severe case of Pectus Excavatum be causing all of this? Plus, I think my case might be more severe than the haller index implies, because of my overall condition with Escobar Syndrome. :/ I'm really worried. If y'all could help, I'd appreciate it. Thanks!

~Alisha
View user's profile View All Posts By User
sweetluvgurl
Contributing Member
***




Posts: 44
Registered: 3-23-2010
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 4-28-2011 at 11:10 PM


Anyone wanna answer my question?
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Sinister
Contributing Member
*****




Posts: 1128
Registered: 5-6-2010
Location: Mass
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 4-28-2011 at 11:43 PM


not sure anyone here could honestly answer this question with any degree of specificity, especially given your complex medical history. But for what it's worth I have never heard of PE causing a collapsed lung or low BP. However many people tolerate partially collapsed lungs very well and many times they are monitored on an outpatient basis. How low was your blood pressure? And is it usually low?

Here are some possible causes according to pub-med health
"A collapsed lung may result from chest trauma, such as gunshot or knife wounds, rib fracture, or after certain medical procedures.

In some cases, a collapsed lung occurs without any cause. This is called a spontaneous pneumothorax. A small area in the lung that is filled with air, called a bleb, ruptures, and the air leaks into the space around the lung.

Certain activities may lead to a collapsed lung. These include scuba diving, smoking marijuana or cigarettes, high altitude hiking, and flying.

Tall, thin people are more likely to a collapsed lung.

Lung diseases such as COPD, asthma, cystic fibrosis, tuberculosis, and whooping cough also increase your risk for a collapsed lung."

Thats about the extent I can be of any help here.




" Whatever you have, you must make the most of it. Rest assured that you can
transform yourself, no matter where you started from. The most important body part is
the mind.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
It_takes_heart
Contributing Members
*****


Avatar


Posts: 112
Registered: 2-11-2011
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 4-29-2011 at 07:18 AM


SLG,
I agree with Sinister and that is probably why you won't get much response on this very serious question. I personally wouldn't eliminate PE from being the cause of a lot of unanswered medical issues, but that doesn't mean PE should take the blame for everything either. I personally had suddenly developed quite high blood pressure over the last 3 years without any medical explanation. I am 51years old, 5' 4", weigh 125 and am phyiscally active and eat healthly. Certainly don't fit the high blood pressure profile. Anyway, I am now 2 1/2 weeks post op and have not had my blood pressure meds since surgery and just took my blood pressure at Wal Mart yesterday. 111/66 It never came down that far even with the meds. Before surgery, Dr. J @ Mayo Clinic said that it will be interesting to see if the surgery would correct my unexplained blood pressure issue. All I can tell you is to continue to research. We are so blessed to have the internet at our fingertips. "History merely repeats itself. It has all been done before. Nothing under the sun is truly new." In our day, someone somewhere is probably recording their amazing medical discovery, in hopes that someone else, maybe on the other side of this amazing planet, can be helped by their newfound knowledge. Best of Luck in your research. I think that's how most of us ended up here to begin with.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
stardark
Contributing Member
*****


Avatar


Posts: 189
Registered: 10-22-2010
Location: Near Detroit
Member Is Offline

Mood: so so

[*] posted on 4-29-2011 at 08:14 AM


Hi Alisha, I would have mentioned this when I first read your question but didn't want to sound like I was being critical of your medical people when I'm not an expert on pneumothorax (Collapsed Lung). I don't understand why they would say you have a Collapsed Lung then not do anything about it immediately.

My experience was like this. I thought I had pneumonia but didn't bother going to the doctor. Ultimately I had very sharp chest pains and did go to the doctor. I was diagnosed with a bad case of pneumonia that caused my left lung to collapse. They sent me straight to the hospital where I spent the next few days with a chest tube to help re-inflate the lung.

Did they tell you to come back for a follow up visit about it or anything?




View user's profile View All Posts By User
techzsue
Contributing Member
*****


Avatar


Posts: 2168
Registered: 8-9-2004
Location: California
Member Is Offline

Mood: determined

[*] posted on 4-29-2011 at 08:21 AM


a reminder that we have no formal medical representation here to advise people. that's not the purpose of this forum.

what we can help you with, is to encourage you to go see a pectus specialist. they can for sure give you the answers you are looking for.:eyes:





this site was created to promote awareness of the condition
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
sleepygirl
Contributing Member
***




Posts: 75
Registered: 1-26-2011
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-12-2011 at 05:26 AM


ITH
Just read how your b/p has been normal since your surgery. Funny thing I was put on b/p meds 1 year after my repair at Hopkins. I am 5'9 and 130 pounds I go to the gym regularly. Since my surgery with Dr J I have also been off my meds. I checked it last week and it was 120/77. My OR records from the Mayo stated I had severe ventricular compression. The TEE video and report from anesthesia stated my left ventricle was inferior to the other. They should be side by side. She said she gave my heart 4 inches of space. I hope that was why I needed the meds. My b/p prior to meds was 160's/105-110's
View user's profile View All Posts By User
BullyBulldog
Contributing Member and Posting Freak
*****


Avatar


Posts: 1393
Registered: 4-30-2008
Location: UK
Member Is Offline

Mood: man-flu grrr

[*] posted on 5-12-2011 at 06:27 AM


ANYBODY can get a collapsed lung its called spontaneous pneumothorax. People who are tall and thin (like many PE sufferers) are far more likely to have one. They are not as uncommon as people think.



Nussed in the UK (NHS) on May 21st 2010 by Hans Pilegaard at the Royal Devon & Exeter Hospital.

View user's profile View All Posts By User

  Go To Top


Powered by XMB 1.9.11
XMB Forum Software © 2001-2011 The XMB Group
[Queries: 17] [PHP: 76.1% - SQL: 23.9%]